Last edited by Mezisida
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

4 edition of comparison of seedlings and clonal cuttings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) found in the catalog.

comparison of seedlings and clonal cuttings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.)

Hans Roulund

comparison of seedlings and clonal cuttings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.)

by Hans Roulund

  • 21 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by Arboretet, [available through] Akademisk Forlag in Horsholm, Kobenhavn .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Norway spruce -- Seedlings.,
  • Norway spruce -- Cuttings.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Hans Roulund.
    SeriesForest tree improvement ;, 10
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSD397.N6 R68
    The Physical Object
    Pagination26 p. :
    Number of Pages26
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4234253M
    ISBN 108750017799
    LC Control Number80514805

    Soluble N compounds in trees exposed to high loads of N: a comparison between the roots of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees grown under field conditions ARTHUR GESSLER Albert‐Ludwigs‐Universität Freiburg, Institut für Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Professur für Baumphysiologie, Am Flugha D‐ • The proportion of saleable seedlings was four percentage points higher in the bottom fraction than in the other seedlings. Abstract We studied the effect of soak-sorting Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) seeds on emer - gence, development and quality of container seedlings in .

    During the growing session of , the total soluble non‐protein nitrogen (TSNN) composition and contents of mycorrhizal fine roots, xylem sap and phloem exudates of roots from a coniferous (Picea abies L.(Karst)) and a deciduous (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree species were analysed at a field site (‘Höglwald’, Germany) exposed to high loads of by:   Cuttings of semi-ripe terminal shoots, 5 - 8cm long, August in a frame. Protect from frost. Forms roots in the spring[78]. Cuttings of mature terminal shoots, 5 - 10cm long, September/October in a cold frame. Takes 12 months[78]. Cuttings of soft to semi-ripe wood, early summer in a .

    seedlings can be induced by short-day treat- ment. Seasonal Variation of Pigments in Needles of Norway Spruce Data concerning the relationship between origin of seed source and content of chloro- phyll in needles of Norway spruce are, as far as the author is informed, not available. Some rather contradictionary reports on. The large pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) is by far the most serious cause of damage to both Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings in southern Finland, Sweden and Norway. The risk of seedling damage by the weevil in unprotected seedlings can be more than 75% after planting ( Cited by: 3.


Share this book
You might also like
Arizonas industrial rock and mineral resources -- workshop proceedings. E.W. Tooker, compiler-editor. Prepared in cooperation with the Arizona Geological Survey

Arizonas industrial rock and mineral resources -- workshop proceedings. E.W. Tooker, compiler-editor. Prepared in cooperation with the Arizona Geological Survey

A history of the Jews in Rome.

A history of the Jews in Rome.

More Paul Harveys Rest of the Story

More Paul Harveys Rest of the Story

Our mysterious panics, 1830-1930

Our mysterious panics, 1830-1930

Passage Of Obstacles Other Than Mine Fields

Passage Of Obstacles Other Than Mine Fields

Talking to strangers

Talking to strangers

Enduring powers of attorney

Enduring powers of attorney

Sluggers! Historys Heaviest Hitters

Sluggers! Historys Heaviest Hitters

Thematic methods and strategies in learning disabilities

Thematic methods and strategies in learning disabilities

giant erinaceid insectivore, Deinogalerix Freudenthal, from the upper Miocene of Gargano, Italy

giant erinaceid insectivore, Deinogalerix Freudenthal, from the upper Miocene of Gargano, Italy

Guide to electrical installation and repair.

Guide to electrical installation and repair.

Comparison of seedlings and clonal cuttings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) by Hans Roulund Download PDF EPUB FB2

Comparison of early height growth between white spruce seedlings and rooted cuttings Article in Canadian Journal of Forest Research 36(12) February with 10 Reads. Mono-clonal forestry of e.g. Norway spruce is not well-tested enough to head for a major fraction of the plant market in the near future; it seems expensive; it has beenAuthor: Dag Lindgren.

Abstract. Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) is one of the most important coniferous species in Europe both from an economic and ecological point of wood products and pulp and paper products have the largest economic value.

The patterns of variation observed in Norway spruce provenance trials show geographic variability on a large by: Comparison of production costs and genetic benefits of transplants and rooted cuttings of Picea sitchensis.

The effect of the cyclophysis and topophysis on the rooting and behavior of Norway spruce cuttings. Acta Hort. 39– A comparison of seedlings and clonal cuttings of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.).

Silv. Gen Cited by: 4. Juvenility and Serial Vegetative Propagation of Norway Spruce Clones (Pice a abies Karst.) By J. CLAIR, J. KLEINSCHMIT and J. SvoLBA Lower Saxony Forest Research Institute, Department of Forest Tree Breeding, D Escherode, West Germany (Received 26th July ) Summary Effects associated with progressive maturation of clones.

Norway spruce (Picea abies) is a tough conifer that makes for an easy-care landscape tree in US Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3 through is also planted extensively for forest restoration and windbreaks. Planting a Norway spruce is easy because it competes well with grass and weeds and requires no site preparation.

Damage to Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings by summer frost was monitored on 10 clear-cuttings of various ages to which slash removal and four types of site preparation had been clear-cuttings were established on two sites (5 on each) in southern Sweden from through and planted each year from the year of cutting until Cited by: Techniques for vegetative propagation of blue spruce (Picea pungens EngelrU.) stem cuttings were investigated.

Time of collection 'of the cuttings, application exogenous rooting hormones and source differences were examined. In apdition. Although Norway spruce has been investigated for growth rate, wood property traits, as well as impact of climate change, only a few studies have been conducted on resistance testing of Norway spruce clones infected by the conifer pathogen.

In this study, sixty-four (3-year-old) Norway spruce clones and seedlings in total from the Finnish. This study compared both options using eight half‐sibling clones of Sitka spruce which were propagated for 18 years.

The four treatments were propagation from the original plant (ortet), hedges from cuttings (ramets) of the first and second propagation cycles, and serial propagation from ramets of the most recent propagation by: 9.

GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS: Norway spruce is an introduced evergreen tree. In central Europe, heights of up to feet (61 m) have been reported []; the range is usually between and feet ( m) [].The bole is usually straight and symmetrical, with no tendency to fork [].The bark of young trees has pale fine shreds [].The bark of older trees is usually heavy with algae and.

Keywords: rooted cuttings, somatic embryogenesis, full sib crosses, controlled crosses, family forestry Repeated efforts in Sweden and elsewhere to use tested clones of Norway spruce in commercial clonal forestry have been going on for forty years, but have failed, and new efforts are commercially unsafe.

Propagate Norway spruce from seeds sown in spring. Seeds usually germinate readily and do not require pre-treatment. The dwarf cultivars may be propagated from tip cuttings of mature shoots taken in summer. Some of the cultivars typically are grafted onto seedlings of the species. In one-year-old container seedlings of Scots pine and Norway spruce the frost hardiness of the roots (the temperature where 50% of seedlings survive) is from −20 °C to −25 °C in mid-winter (Lindström,Lindström and Stattin, ), but the roots may suffer damage at higher temperatures reducing the roots’ ability to grow in the Cited by: 4.

Fig. a, b) Shoot height and c, d) stem diameter of a, c) Scots pine and b, d) Norway spruce seedlings planted in the nursery field in Suonenjoki biweekly in autumn and once in spring Height and diameters were measured at planting and at the end of two growing seasons after planting.

Vertical bars indicate the standard errors of means and different letters indicate statistically Cited by: 4. With the present plastic-house technique it is possible to produce about 3-yr-old cuttings per ortet in years. The main limitations of clonal forestry are ageing of the mother plant, which with Norway spruce begins to take effect at the age of 5 yr, and the lack of genetic variation.

Clonal mixtures are recommended for practical : U. Gullberg. Abstract. Four-year-old seedlings of Piceaabies [L.] Karst (Norway spruce) were grown in semi-controlled conditions with three watering regimes. The seedlings in the control group (c) were watered to prevent any dehydration effect.

The two remaining groups were subjected to mild (ms) and severe water stress (ss), by: Realized ectomycorrhizal (ECM) colonization patterns of Norway spruce seedlings.

The bar chart shows the abundance of both nonmycorrhizal (nm) and ECM root tips of fast‐ and slow‐growing spruce seedlings in 12 treatments inoculated with Tylospora asterophora (T.a), Piloderma sp.

Cited by: Four-year-old seedlings of Picea abies [L.] Karst (Norway spruce) were grown in semi-controlled conditions with three watering regimes.

The seedlings in the control group (c) were watered to prevent any dehydration effect. The two remaining groups were subjected to mild (ms) and severe water stress (ss), by: cuttings and seeds for timber production, by assessing field survival, growth and strobilus production using cuttings from male and female plants, collected from different positions, compared with those produced by sexual reproduction.

Clones of male and female trees from different types of cuttings and seedlings were planted in 3 x 3 m spacing Cited by: 3. Climatic control of bud burst in young seedlings of nine provenances of Norway spruce.

Søgaard G(1), Johnsen O, Nilsen J, Junttila O. Author information: (1)Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. BoxNO As, Norway.

[email protected] by: SCIENTIFIC NAME: Picea abies FAMILY: Pinaceae Hardiness Zones 3B to Range Native to Northern and Central Europe, it was introduced in colonial times. Growth habit In youth, Norway Spruce is stiff, but has a fast growth rate and a dense slows some with maturity and trees become a bit more open and pyramidal with graceful upward sweeping branches.Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) ) is a key species for forest production in the Northern Hemisphere, including Sweden [].To meet the increased demand for wood products, propagation of superior trees from breeding programs is necessary [1,2].This has usually required seed orchards, which are expensive and have problems with both pollen contamination and cone diseases [], or clonal Author: Julia Dahrendorf.